Managing/Healing Seborrheic Dermatitis: My Skin Routine Now

It’s been a long time since I last wrote, but I have been hard at work trying to get my skin and overall health in a better place. My whole life, my skin has been a series of woes and complications. I have always had to put in twice as much effort as others even just for mediocre skin. After hundreds of products, many years, and many more tears, I am finally in a place where I can say, “I HAVE GREAT SKIN!!” Knowing there are many others out there who struggle with acne, oily skin, seborrheic dermatitis, and other relentless skin conditions, I decided to compile a comprehensive article of what I am doing now and what changes I have made. I hope this post will be helpful for others, although be ready for a pretty lengthy article, though I will do my best to cut out anything that isn’t essential information. Feel free to ask questions if there’s something you want to know. Let’s start from the beginning.

A Little History

As a teenager, I had moderate to severe cystic acne (closer to the severe side than the moderate side) and undiagnosed seborrheic dermatitis, mostly on my scalp. I started puberty very early, having my first period at 8 or 9 years old. By the time I was 10, I was having some pretty serious skin issues, and by the time I was 13, I had stopped growing (I still say I was cheated out of my true height). My periods were horribly painful events as well, which eventually led to seeing an endocrinologist at around 15. At that time, I was diagnosed with high testosterone and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). I was having issues with blood sugar, probably as a result of the PCOS, so I was put on metformin, but quickly stopped taking it after it made me sick (and I mean sick all the time). In addition, I was put on birth control pills to help with the PCOS and testosterone dominance.

While the birth control pills helped with my periods, even after seeing a dermatologist since I was 12 and being put on a series of topical antibiotics and oral antibiotics and using every skin care regimen under the sun (tried Proactive twice, tried Clinique for several years, etc.), I saw practically no resolution for my acne. The dermatologist eventually decided to put me on Accutane, and this cleared up my skin beautifully–for a few years anyway. I was 19 when I was put on Accutane, and by the time I was 22, my skin seemed to start rebelling against me again. At 22, I also decided to stop the birth control pill, but my periods were wildly irregularly after that, and who knows what the heck was going on with my hormones! As I got into my early 20’s, I also started using more and more natural products, doing a lot of research on diet and nutrition, and started my long road of overhauling my entire lifestyle.

Fast Forward to Today Relatively Recently

I’m getting ahead of myself ! We need a little more background.

My irregular periods continued until I started bioidentical hormone replacement therapy. To my surprise, I was not diagnosed with high testosterone, but with low progesterone, so now I am supplementing bioidentical progesterone (not to be mistaken for plant-based [phyto] progesterone or phytoestrogens). So my hormones were all good at this point, but my skin was still…well, mediocre.

My skincare regime had evolved several times at this point. I had tried oil cleansing, oil cleansing with steam, carrot masks, tea tree oil, honey: the extreme of all natural. This stuff works for a lot of people, and that’s great. However, much to my dismay, it did not work for me. My only guess is that my skin is so complicated and has had compounded effects of using very harsh products (Clinique and Proactive? Super harsh) in addition to my already existing skin problems, especially seborrheic dermatitis. Seborrheic dermatitis seemed to cause excessive layers of dead skin on my face and scalp, worsened by increased oil, which made these layers stubborn as hell when trying to remove. It took me a very long time to even figure out I had seborrheic dermatitis. I gave up on the dermatologist after 20, as they were really not helping me at all and were unwilling to try a different approach. They just kept throwing the same stuff at me, hoping it would work. Well, it never did.

Rant aside, I used oils for a while and went completely natural. Because of my seborrheic dermatitis, though, it wasn’t very effective. It was like the oil would just sit on top of my face and would have almost no cleansing effect at all. Needless to say, that didn’t last very long. After a while, having switched back to somewhat more traditional cleansers, I read more about sulfates in cleansing products. Sulfates, which are actually used for desiccants (absorb moisture to keep products dry), are so harsh that they remove more moisture from the skin than the skin or any lotion can replenish. Sulfates dry the skin down to such a deep layer, your lotion will never reach how far your skin has been stripped of moisture. This has a compounding effect: dry skin will become increasingly dryer, and oily skin will freak out and increase the amount of oil produced to make up for the moisture loss–except the oil produced is usually poor quality oil and it ends up just giving you very greasy skin.

After this revelation, I immediately switched both my skin cleansers (face and body wash) and shampoo to sulfate-free. The change was immediate and improved more with time. I saw probably an 80% reduction in the oiliness of my skin once I started using only sulfate-free cleansers. To illustrate this, before switching to sulfate-free products, I had been using French green clay on my face once a week, and this was perfect to manage my oiliness for a week. After I started using a sulfate-free cleanser, the French green clay was way too drying, even with jojoba oil added to it! This was a pretty dramatic step toward amazing skin, and I recommend to everyone, even those who do not have skin problems, switch to sulfate-free! Your skin will thank you for it. Sulfate-free products are also becomingly increasingly easy to find. I eventually even switched to sulfate-free hand soap, because I get eczema on my hands. I don’t get eczema on my hands anymore!

As I was making this sulfate-free switch, I was also getting more acquainted with high-quality skincare brands. It is still a lot of trial and error, as some products are just the right composition to be brilliant for one person’s skin, but may not be worth the price tag for another person’s skin. It can be overwhelming how many options there are now, but I can speak from experience in saying that it is worth trying a ton of different products when you finally find the ones that work. One of the greatest resources for me has been a website called My Pure. It is a UK-based company that ships worldwide (only ~$7 for shipping, too!) and has some of the best all-natural and organic European brands on the market. My favorite for body wash, body lotion, and hand lotion is Madara. Their products are amazing. The cost is a little bit high, but try it just once, and I think you will find it worth it.

Okay, Now Fast Forward to Today

Yay! Now I get to tell you about what I have done in the past few weeks that has really transformed my skin!

Facial Products
Let’s start with facial products, as I have already discussed the body lotion I am using. I have fallen in love with South Korean skincare products. They are the leading country in formulating great skincare products that are plant-based, while Western countries tend to believe in the power of chemicals to make great skin products (this does not work well for a lot of people). Many people who have very sensitive skin have had great success switching to South Korean products, and I don’t mean “South Korean” products sold at Sephora. I mean South Korean products directly from South Korea.

These can be found on Amazon, though some people claimed to have received fake products (I’ve never had this problem, and you can buy from South Korean shops through Amazon). I prefer to order all my Asian cosmetics from YesStyle, as it is a store I trust and have been shopping on for years. Some brand names that spring to mind if you aren’t sure where to start is Innisfree and Etude House. The Face Shop and Nature Republic are two brands that are also very good and a little less expensive than Innisfree or Etude House. I have been very happily using a combination of Innisfree, The Face Shop, and Nature Republic for months now. They all have a green tea series, which is what I have really been liking, as green tea has lots of great properties. I recently decided to switch completely to Innisfree products for skincare, as it has received slightly better reviews, a few of which were written by girls with oily skin issues. Once I have tried these, I will post my own review. Right now, this is what my routine looks like:

Morning
Face: Innisfree Green Tea Cleansing Foam, The Face Shop Green Tea Waterfull Emulsion for face and neck, Replenix CF Cream for eyes, Nature Republic Fresh Green Tea 80 Cream
Back of neck, upper arms, shoulders, chest, and upper back: Body Merry Retinol Surge Moisturizer (contains retinol/vitamin A, hyaluronic acid, vitamin E + B5, and green tea)
Evening
Face: Skin Blossom Gentle Cleansing Milk or baby oil for makeup removal (for both, I just massage the product on my face and use toilet tissue to gently wipe the makeup away. It works great and makes a huge difference in how oily my skin gets overnight.), The Face Shop Green Tea Waterfull Serum, Body Merry Retinol Surge Moisturizer
Breasts and decollete: Mio Boob Tube+ with a few drops of Evening Primrose Oil
Back of neck, upper arms, shoulders, and upper back: Body Merry Retinol Surge Moisturizer

There are a couple more items I want to mention about my skincare. I have been getting microdermabrasion treatments for a few weeks, which has made a world of difference in removing those excessive layers of dead skin on my face. Since I started getting these treatments, which I get every 8 weeks, my skin products absorb MUCH faster and are much more effective. If you have seborrheic dermatitis, I highly recommend going through a series of microdermabrasion treatments. I am hoping it will “reset” my skin. Once those layers of dead skin are removed after years of skin abuse, I hope my skin will not feel the need to create such a barrier now that my skin care routine is much gentler. This is also one of the reasons I decided microdermabrasion over chemical peel. As the name suggests, chemical peels are very harsh, and I know my skin: it has a tendency to overreact and then I am worse off than I started. I am still getting the microdermabrasion treatments now, but I am really curious to find out how my skin does when I stop getting them.

Also, I do exfoliate once a week, but now that I’m getting microdermabrasion treatments, I can use a really gentle exfoliator and get great results! I had tried the Japanese product Natural Aqua Gel Cure (available on Amazon) without a very satisfying outcome several months ago before getting microdermabrasion. However, now it is the perfect exfoliant: gentle enough not to cause an overreaction in my skin, but just enough to smooth my skin very nicely and help my products absorb better. I hope this continues to be a good option for me even after I stop the microdermabrasion.

Now that I’ve discussed all of my skincare products, there are a few other essential changes I have made to my lifestyle.

Detox
This is important for overall health and even more important for the skin. The skin is a major elimination organ, meaning anything the body wants to get rid of gets pushed out of the body and through the skin. This means that if your body is overloaded with toxins, chemicals, anything at all that the body is wanting to remove, your skin is going to constantly be impacted negatively. Your body probably needs some detox support to effectively clear everything out, and by properly clearing things out, your skin will eventually reach a point where it is not always being irritated by what the body is trying to get rid of.

There are lots of different ways to detox. I prefer the daily/weekly mild detoxing methods over the debilitating once a year liver detoxes that I have only ever read about. As such, I will limit my discussion to what I’m doing now. First, I go to the sauna twice weekly for 30 minutes. Sauna is amazing for detoxing and deep skin cleansing! I have read of people who have healed their seborrheic dermatitis using sauna as part of their treatment. Sauna has a lot of the same benefits as cardio workouts, including increasing human growth hormone. Known as the “hormone of youth”, human growth hormone is essential for repair. I would caution against using sauna too often, as it can cause dehydration if you’re not careful, but 2-3 times a week is great. To read more about the benefits of sauna, read here, here, and here.

Another detox element I have added to my lifestyle is some detox supplements. As part of my bioidentical hormone therapy, I have been taking supplements containing DIM, 3-indole-carbinol, and milk thistle (I use EstroSense). All these support liver detox, especially hormone metabolism. The pills tend to be slightly too large for me to swallow comfortably, so I have been breaking the capsules open and dumping it in with my daily protein shake.

The last step I have added is daily skin brushing and weekly exfoliation. Skin brushing using a dry brush helps stimulate the skin and increase blood flow. It is also great if you have skin problems, as it is a light exfoliation that you can do on a daily basis. I brush in the evening before using my creams. I also use a salux (available on Amazon) once a week for a slightly more intense exfoliation. This is especially important for my chest, back, and upper arms/shoulders where I still have a lot of active acne. I love being able to do this, because it is a really easy way to add some detox support specifically to the skin on a daily basis.

One more thing that’s really important: Collagen Protein Powder
This is probably the basis of my great skin now. Collagen is a building block for skin (and joints, hair, and nails, but let’s focus on the skin). The body loses its ability after age 30 to product its own collagen, therefore supplementing collagen is very important if you have skin troubles. The way you supplement it is critical, though. The body is best able to absorb collagen when it is in a liquid form. The good news is, this is really easy to find. I use Bulletproof Collagen Protein Powder daily. Powder collagen is a little more expensive than tablets, but it is much more effective and easier to take. It dissolves readily into any liquid, and a good quality collagen powder will have no flavor. It will take a minimum of 4 weeks to see results, though for people over 30, it may take up to 8 weeks, so be patient and consistent with taking it.

The jury is still out on this one, but I will mention it anyway: Injuv Hyaluronic Acid
One of my previously mentioned creams, the retinol cream, contains hyaluronic acid. Hyaluronic acid is essential for cells to maintain intracellular water levels, which means this is directly connected to moisture levels for skin cells. Injuv variety hyaluronic acid (available at a reasonable price through Swanson Vitamins–especially when they have it on sale) is an oral supplement that has undergone an enzymatic process that makes it absorb more easily. I recently started taking this, as some say it is even more important for skin health than collagen! The two together should make a killer combo, but as I have not been taking it long enough to say one way or the other, the jury is still out. I will report back once I have gone through the first 4 weeks. There are other benefits to taking hyaluronic acid, though: detox. Hyaluronic acid is needed by cells to help remove metabolic debris and dead cells out of the system. This in addition to its moisture benefits makes hyaluronic acid a great one-two for both skin support and cellular detox.

The Takeaway

  • Sulfate-Free! This is so important. If you do nothing else, switch to sulfate-free cleansers, even if it’s only for your facial cleanser, body wash, and shampoo. This will help your skin better maintain its moisture balance and will help make your lotions and hair conditioner effective.
  • Detox For overall health, detoxing is essential, especially today when we are surrounded by all kinds of pollution, chemicals, and stress. There are lots of different detox targets from overall detox to liver detox to cellular detox. Any kind of detoxing you can add to your daily routine will help. I don’t recommend doing harsh liver detoxes that last for only a few days or weeks. I believe more in including detox as a part of lifestyle, as I think removing toxins as they enter the body is more effective than letting toxins hang out in the body for a while before removing them.Sauna is a great overall detox method and is fairly easily accessible through a gym. Sauna has other great health benefits as well, such as increasing human growth hormone, which is essential in repair functions of the body. Sauna is also said to help in healing all kinds of skin conditions. For the best results, use only 2 or 3 times a week for 30 minutes. If you don’t have access to a gym with a sauna, but still want to use a sauna, you can find sauna kits for your home online (and the prices are surprisingly reasonable).

    Adding detox support supplements to your diet is the easiest daily detox step you can add to your regime. If you’re targeting hormone detox, milk thistle, indole-3-carbinol, and/or DIM are great. To target the skin more specifically, using hyaluronic acid helps with cellular detox and is essential for maintaining moisture.

    Skin brushing, while a little more effort, is an easy way to add daily exfoliation to your skincare routine. Using a salux once a week can help maintain smooth skin in stubborn areas where you’re still waiting for seborrheic dermatitis to resolve. These both can help manage acne as well.

  • Collagen For the most effective collagen supplementation, use powdered collagen. It’s really easy to mix with beverages you’re already drinking like coffee, tea, or even just water. Collagen is the building block for joints and skin. After age 30, the body begins to lose its ability to produce its own collagen, so supplementing even before 30 can only help your skin.
  • Be Gentle Avoid harsh products. They will only aggravate your skin, and your skin will in turn aggravate you for it. As much as you’re able, it is best to use natural products. South Korean skincare products are well known for their very gentle ingredients, and most people who have a history of very sensitive skin do great with these products! The price for these products is also quite reasonable, especially in comparison to some of the products you will find at places like Sephora.
  • Most Importantly, BE PATIENT, BE CONSISTENT The body needs time to make adjustments. Taking collagen supplements is important, and you will probably start out very enthusiastically, but you won’t start seeing a difference in your skin for 4-8 weeks as the skin is the body’s last priority (it will use the collagen as needed in other areas first). Hyaluronic acid supplementation will also take a few weeks to see results with. It may also take longer to see results with sauna and other detox methods, as the body will have a lot of detoxing to do initially and with time will have less to eliminate. In the case of exfoliation methods (microdermabrasion, skin brushing, and salux use) and switching cleansers, you will see a difference right away.

I hope this article has been helpful and informative! Please feel free to leave comments if you have any questions and best of luck on your journey to amazing skin!

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Blephoritis Tea Tree Oil Treatment Update

So this is a follow-up to my post about tea tree oil for treating blephoritis. Luckily, I write this with good news: it’s made a huge difference. I’ve been using it for two weeks now, and I’ve seen some big changes. First, I’m not having tear attacks daily (when your eyes start randomly watering and then start stinging). I still get them occasionally, but they used to occur every day. Another thing I’ve noticed is my eyelids are starting to become sensitive again. This might sound strange, but something I’ve noticed about blephoritis and seborrheic dermatitis is how insensitive skin becomes. I used to scrub my eyelids every morning and evening with a pretty rough wash cloth to exfoliate, because it was the only thing I knew how to do. It was never painful and my skin was never sensitive after that. Now, however, I can’t use a wash cloth to scrub my eyelids anymore. It becomes very irritated, which I actually take as a very good sign. I’m seeing similar changes to using tallow on my eyelids and face (see my post on tallow for oily skin and seborrheic dermatitis to find out more).

When I first started using the tea tree oil, I applied it twice a day to the base of my lashes. I found it to be too irritating to use twice a day after about a week, so I’ve reduced it to once in the evening now. My eyelids still get quite oily during the day, but I’m hoping with time this will improve.

I have added a couple new items to my daily routine: Moroccan Rose toner and Natural Aqua Gel Cure exfoliator. I haven’t used them long enough to write a review for them yet, but I’ll post a review for those soon. Another item I really like for blephoritis or just tired eyes are hot eye masks by KAO. They’re so relaxing, and unlike taking a wash cloth with warm water, the heat lasts 10-15 minutes. It’s about $15 for 14 masks, and you can find it on Amazon in several different scents.

Also, I’m planning to start a video blog to accompany my posts. I mostly want videos to go with my reviews, so if you’re more of a video person, check out my channel and stay tuned! I hope to have my first video review posted within a week.

Blephoritis Not Clearing Up?

For a few years now, I’ve struggled with blephoritis. Small surprise considering I already have oily skin and seborrheic dermatitis. For the past few years, I’ve taken good care to have good eyelid hygiene: wash twice a day with facial cleanser, scrub with a washcloth to remove any dirt, and moisturize with an oily skin-friendly product. The doctors always tell me this should be good enough, but it hasn’t been. It’s only gotten worse over the past couple of years, and I’m at my wits end. My eyelids are puffy and there are splits in my eyelash line. My eyes get dried out from the puffiness of my eyelids. I have tear attacks, where my eyes start randomly watering and stinging and then watering more (and they happen at very bad times like when I’m driving). So I got on the internet, because so far the doctors have been only useful for getting antibiotic and steroid eyedrops from–which never solves the problem.

What I found was quite surprising. Another common cause of blephoritis is an allergy or infestation of skin mites (demodex), which naturally reside on the skin and help remove buildup. These skin mites can also cause the symptoms of seborrheic dermatitis. With an allergy, like an allergy to dust mites, this would obviously cause swelling, which leads to clogged pours and all of the other problems encountered with blephoritis. I would guess with an allergy, one of the most common symptoms is probably itching, which I’m not sure all blephoritis sufferers have this. I entertained the idea that maybe a mite allergy or infestation was the problem, so I kept reading to see what solutions might be.

They were quite simple: good eyelid hygiene (check) and a 5-35% tea tree oil solution. I could have spent $50 on a tea tree cleanser for my eyelids, but I already had tea tree oil sitting around the house, so I decided to try that first. I diluted it to approximately 5% with sterile eye wash water and applied a drop with a dropper to a cotton ball and dabbed it onto my eyelids, making sure to get the eyelash lines. I had immediate relief from the itching, which really surprised me. I didn’t expect results, or at least no results that quickly. I’ve continued doing this twice daily for three days now and already have had fewer tear attacks and less eye dryness. If you haven’t tried this for your blephoritis woes yet, it’s inexpensive to try and may be the solution you’ve needed all along.There’s also the option of looking for a demodex cleanser online, which can get more expensive, but may be a better option for some. If you think your seborrheic dermatitis may be a demodex-related issue, it would also be worth trying the tea tree cleansers to see if it clears things up.

I plan to write a follow-up post in maybe a month and hopefully will see a reduction in swelling and pore clogs.

Lotions Suitable for Seboherreic Dermatitis

I’ve experimented a lot over the past few years trying to find skincare items that work for me. No thanks to this pesky condition, things have been quite tricky. That’s why I want to share some of the lotions I’ve found work really well for me. Maybe you’ll find them helpful, too!

・゚:*Face Lotion*:・゚

The first and probably most important. It took a while and a lot of experimenting to find something that worked, but I actually found an amazing lotion that has high concentrations of antioxidants in it, which actually helps to treat the condition. After I found it on Amazon, I noticed a lot of Amazon reviewers with this condition were saying the same thing, so I hope you’ll try Topix Pharm Replenix CF Cream. It’s a little expensive ($37-50, depending on what deals are available at the time), but it really is worth it. I save a little money by only using it in the evenings, but I would be better off using it twice a day. Also, be careful to get the cream and not the serum. I found the serum doesn’t work as well.

・゚:*Body Lotion*:・゚

While I was living in England, I discovered an amazing website: mypure.co.uk. I still order a lot of my skincare products from them (and all my lipsticks, Lavera is the best!), and they’re great! Great customer service, fast shipping, and their shipping costs are very reasonable. They carry a brand called Madara, which has saved my skin in a way I didn’t think was possible. I started using Madara’s body washes, and my skin doesn’t get anywhere near as oily as it used to. They’re very gentle and light and not at all drying. Additionally, I also started using their Moisturising Lotion (£13 or about $16) for normal/dry skin. This lotion absorbs quickly and moisturizes well without leaving any heavy residue on your skin. Even for my skin, which tends to be oily, this lotion is heaven! I will never spend another dime on any other lotion again.

How I Went from Very Oily Skin to Almost Normal Skin

It’s been a long journey to get my skin to calm down. Since hitting puberty, I’ve had the oiliest skin I’ve ever known anyone to have. I went through a round of Acutane, which helped for a while, and then after a couple of years, I was back to square one (though the acne was dramatically improved). It didn’t help that I was living in the humid Ohio River Valley. I reached a point where I was okay with very oily skin and just learned to cope with it. Somehow, I never quite gave up, though, and kept looking for ways to get it under better control.

I finally have, and I want to share with you what I did to do that. It was only recently that I got it completely under control, which is why this post isn’t making it out there until just now. I used to do everything the dermatologist suggested: wash with a special acne wash, blot your skin, make sure you use makeup remover, etc. etc. I went through the Clinique line and their four (I think it’s four) step program. I did everything the dermatologists and cosmeticians were telling me to do. Things didn’t improve until I decided maybe bombarding my skin with chemicals wasn’t going to fix anything, and even if it didn’t fix anything, it would still be taking better care of my skin if I removed chemicals from my routine. As such, I tried things like oil cleansing (rather messy and leaves a lot of greasy laundry to do). Oil cleansing was fine, but it wasn’t so good for removing makeup, so in the evening I went back to my good old Neutrogena. Eventually, I heard about cleansing with lemon juice. Lemon juice easily removes excess oil without dehydrating the skin. Perfect! Except it doesn’t remove makeup. Okay, so lemon juice in the morning. This was one of the best discoveries of my skin journey, because lemon juice is simple to use, a natural astringent if you have oily skin or large pores, and it really does do a great job of cleaning the skin without drying it out.

So what about removing makeup? That was my last challenge. I had been using Neutrogena for my evening routine to remove my makeup, because it was the only thing I knew that would really get my face clean. I had been using it for my body wash as well, because my back, chest, and shoulders were especially prone to oiliness as well. Then I heard about sulfate-free cleansers, and I thought I should try a sulfate-free cleanser on my body to see if it would get the oiliness under control. Well, I saw a difference immediately. Then I decided to try it on my face. If it works on my body, it should work on my face. And it did! It removed the makeup and didn’t cause my face to get horrifically oily overnight. I was already using sulfate-free shampoo to help control the seborrhea on my scalp. I don’t know why I didn’t think to use it on my face and body sooner to control the seborrhea everywhere else.

And that’s it. I use lemon juice in the morning. It’s so inexpensive! I get a lemon and squeeze as much juice out as possible into a small brown cosmetic bottle and keep it in the fridge. You can also water it down if it’s a little too potent for your skin. I use a cotton pad by putting it over the mouth of the bottle and shaking up twice, and then simply wipe over my face once, and I’m done! Now in the evening, I use a sulfate-free cleanser (I also want to try a cleansing milk) and washcloth to remove makeup and buff my skin smooth. I then apply a small amount of borage (or starflower) seed oil, and that’s all I need! I’ve even started applying a small amount of starflower oil in the morning before I put my makeup on to keep my skin supple for application. It works beautifully! My chest and back don’t get oily at all anymore. It’s saved a lot of my clothes, because as you may know, oil can be rather destructive on clothes and difficult to wash out. My skin has never been so healthy!

I hope this revelation I’ve shared helps you in your skin journey!

For my body wash, I use Madara Refreshing Soap. Once I find a sulfate-free facial cleanser or cleansing milk, I’ll share that with you as well!

Four Easy Ways to be Kind to Your Skin

I’ve always been a big fan of natural means for skin care, so I wanted to share some of my favorite tips for treating your skin right!

Use Sulfate-Free Products

Recently, I discovered how big of a difference it makes switching to sulfate-free body wash and facial cleanser, especially if you tend to have oily skin. One of the top ingredients in 90% of cleansing products is a sulfate-based compound that is very irritating to the skin and dries it out. This ingredient also can be found in most shampoos, and can be harsh on the scalp and hair. One of the best things I did for my skin and hair was to completely get rid of sulfate-containing washes.

Delicious Treats for Your Face:
Honey and Sugar

Nothing feels more refreshing than a spa day at home. I try to do face masks and scrubs weekly. My favorite face scrub can be made using things from your kitchen: honey and sugar. Honey has moisturizing and antibacterial properties, which helps if you tend to have breakouts. It is also very soothing. I try to buy high quality honey to get the most out of my scrubs. Sugar will help exfoliate the skin and make it nice and smooth.  Use only maybe 1/4-1/2 teaspoon of honey and maybe a teaspoon of sugar for your whole face. Use just a few drops of water once you have the honey and sugar on your face to make it easier to spread and scrub.

Delicious Treats for Your Face:
Yogurt

Another face treat I love is a simple yogurt mask. It’s especially refreshing during hot summers. Yogurt will moisturize and smooth skin while dissolving dead skin and helping pores shrink. Apply generously and let it sit for 20 minutes before rinsing off.

Sun Protection in a Tablet

I do not like sun block. My skin tends to be oily, and sun block makes it worse. Most people don’t realize this, but taking vitamin D acts as natural sun block. When the body has enough vitamin D, the receptors in the skin that receive vitamin D from the sun close. You will still tan from sun exposure even if taking vitamin D, but if you take enough, you won’t burn. I usually take 5,000IU a day. If tablet size is a problem, I recommend Nature’s Bounty 1,000IU gel capsules if you’re in the US (you can find them in almost any store), or Epsilon 5,000IU tablets if you’re in the UK (you can order these on Amazon).